Christmas Jazz brought music from Europe, Africa and America

20. detsember 2007

12th international festival Christmas Jazz was held from December 4th to 17th in six towns all over Estonia and brought over 5000 people to churches and concert halls.

12th international festival Christmas Jazz was held from December 4th to 17th in six towns all over Estonia and brought over 5000 people to churches and concert halls.

This time the festival was as brightly colored as Santa’s gift bag. It contained music from Europe, America and Africa. The music of the black miners of South-Africa was performed by known vocal headliner Ladysmith Black Mambazo and was received extremely well. A big and pleasant surprise to the people who had only listened to their music on CDs was the group´s vibrant and exciting stage show that made the audience think that they witnessed an African celebration.

Quite Quiet Duo gave an intimate concert with their guitar and zithers. Swedish melodies were introduced in their sweet and delicate way by Anomie Orchestra. Footsteps were sung straight to the soul by Siiri Sisask accompanied by pianist Kristjan Randalu and his quartet.

Liisi Koikson sang a tribute to her favorite artist Joni Mitchell. Sister and brothers Johansons had deep thoughts about the way of the world. Willane Bluus proved that Estonians know the blues as did soloists Kaire Vilgats and Riho Sibul with their emotionally loaded voices. A star from Finnish soul-sky Tuomo demonstrated his full creative powers and stylish performance.

Charity concert „Help Bring Life“ – a beautiful tradition that brings together the children of Estonian Radio Singing Studio and many beloved Estonian artists – brought joy to many big and small listeners. Guests of the concert Hedvig Hanson and James Werts sung songs of Christmas and winter.

Heavenly, timeless and very special concert was given by Tunisian vocalist and oud player Dhafer Youssef with Estonian choir of Gregorian chant Vox Clamantis. This sort of mixture of sacral and ornamental music had not yet been heard by Estonian audience.

Some of the concerts were broadcasted by European Broadcasting Union and so made Christmas Jazz available for more than 3,5 million listeners in many European countries.